English Comprehension

Q: Certain scraps of evidence bear out those who hold a very high opinion of the average level of culture among the Athenians of the great age. Pericless funeral speech is undoubtedly the most famous evidence from Athenian literature, that its level was indeed high. However, Pericles was a politician, and it is possible that he was flattering his audience. We know that thousands of Athenians sat hour after hour in the theater listening to the plays of the great Greek dramatists. The Greek plays, particularly the tragedies, maintained an extremely high intellectual level throughout, with no letdowns, no concessions to the lowbrows or to the demands of realism, like the gravediggers scene in Shakespeares Hamlet. The music and dancing seen in these plays were also of an equally high level. The best modern parallel can be seen in the restrained, difficult opera of the 18th century. The comparison is no doubt dangerous, but can you imagine almost the entire population of an American city (in suitable installments, of course) sitting through performances of Mozarts Don Giovanni or Glucks Orpheus? Perhaps the Athenian masses went to these plays because of a lack of other amusements. They could at least understand something of what went on, since the subjects were part of their folklore. Undoubtedly the theme of grand opera is not part of the folklore of the American people. Question: From the passage it is evident that the author seems to question the sincerity of A. politicians B. playwrights C. opera goers D. low brows E. grave diggers.

(a) :  A
(b) :  B
(c) :  C
(d) :  D
(e) :  E
Answer:  A
Explanation:  

Q: Always read the meter dials from the right to the left. This procedure is much easier, especially if any of the dial hands are near the zero mark. If the meter has two dials, and one is smaller than the other, then it is not imperative to read the smaller dial because it only registers a small amount. Read the dial at the right first. As the dial turns clockwise, always record the figure the pointer has just passed. Read the next dial to the left and record the figure it has just passed. Continue recording the figures on the dials from right to left. When finished, mark off the number of units recorded. Dials on water and gas meters usually indicate the amount each dial records. Question: Always read the meter dials... A. From top to bottom. B. From right to left. C. From left to right. D. From the small to the large dial. E. From the large dial to the small dial.

(a) :  a
(b) :  b
(c) :  c
(d) :  d
(e) :  e
Answer:  b
Explanation:  

Q: Some modern anthropologists hold that biological evolution has shaped not only human morphology but also human behavior. The role those anthropologists ascribe to evolution is not of dictating the details of human behavior but one of imposing constraints - ways of feeling, thinking, and acting that come naturally in archetypal situations in any culture. Our frailties - emotions and motives such as rage, fear, greed, gluttony, joy, lust, love-may be a very mixed assortment quality: we are, as we say, in the grip of them. And thus they give us our sense of constraints. Unhappily, some of those frailties our need for ever-increasing security among them is presently maladaptive. Yet beneath the overlay of cultural detail, they, too, are said to be biological in direction, and therefore as natural to us as are our appendixes. We would need to comprehend thoroughly their adaptive origins in order to understand how badly they guide us now. And we might then begin to resist their pressure. Question: The primary purpose of the passage is to present A. A position on the foundations of human behavior and on what those foundations imply B. A theory outlining the parallel development of human morphology and of human behavior C. A diagnostic test for separating biologically determined behavior patters from culture - specific detail D. An overview of those human emotions and motives that impose constraints on human behaviour E. A practical method for resting the pressures of biologically determined drives.

(a) :  A
(b) :  B
(c) :  C
(d) :  D
(e) :  E
Answer:  A
Explanation:  

Q: The first person in the group starts off by naming anything that is geographical. It could be a city, state, country, river, lake, or any proper geographical term. For example, the person might say, "Boston." The second person has 10 seconds to think of how the word ends and come up with another geographical term starting with that letter. The second participant might say, "Norway," because the geographical term has to start with "N." The third person would have to choose a word beginning with "Y." If a player fails to think of a correct answer within the time limit, that player is out of the game. The last person to survive is the champion. Question: The answer must be... A. In New York. B. Within the United States. C. A proper geographical term. D. In the same region. E. Along a coast line.

(a) :  a
(b) :  b
(c) :  c
(d) :  d
(e) :  e
Answer:  c
Explanation:  

Q: The explosion of a star is an awesome event. The most violent of these cataclysms, which produce supernovae, probably destroys a star completely. Within our galaxy of roughly 100 billion stars the last supernova was observed in 1604. Much smaller explosions, however, occur quite frequently, giving rise to what astronomers call novae and dwarf novae. On the order of 25 novae occur in our galaxy every year, but only two or three are near enough to be observed. About 100 dwarf novae are known altogether. If the exploding star is in a nearby part of the galaxy, it may create a “new star” that was not previously visible to the naked eye. The last new star of this sort that could be observed clearly from the Northern Hemisphere appeared in 1946. In these smaller explosions the star loses only a minute fraction of its mass and survives to explode again. Astrophysicists are fairly well satisfied that they can account for the explosions of supernovae. The novae and dwarf novae have presented more of a puzzle. From recent investigations that have provided important new information about these two classes of exploding star, the picture that emerges is quite astonishing. It appears that every dwarf nova – and perhaps every nova – is a member of a pair of stars. The two stars are so close together that they revolve around a point that lies barely outside the surface of the larger star. As a result the period of rotation is usually only a few hours, and their velocities range upward to within a two-hundredth of the speed of light. Question: When novae and dwarf novae occur, A. the star survive to explode again B. the star destroys completely C. the star devides in two parts D. the star becomes a dwarf novae E. None of these

(a) :  A
(b) :  B
(c) :  C
(d) :  D
(e) :  E
Answer:  A
Explanation:  

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